World Art: 5 Top Art Picks for February ~ Space, Time and Reflection

It is a well-known fact that the first few weeks of a new year are a crucial time to stop, refocus and reflect. The chaos of the holiday season is now well and truly behind us and it is time to concentrate on what matters. Top visual trend spotters Adobe Stock predict that one of the biggest art trends of 2018 will be silence, solitude, reflection and contemplation – so we have put together our top five global picks for exhibitions that will help you utilize February in order to pause, reflect and ultimately embrace the year ahead:

 

#1: David Hockney at the Met, NY ~ until February 25th 2018 

Arguably Britain’s most important living painter, this exhibition is the perfect opportunity to enjoy a retrospective from an artist now in his 80th year. Pause to enjoy a diverse range of colourful and vibrant paintings, drawings and photographs that playfully and yet intelligently embrace movement, space and time via the investigation of landscapes, portraiture and swimming pools! ​Remember: Contemplation can be colourful.

https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2017/david-hockney

 

 

#2: Andreas Gursky at The Hayward Gallery, London ~ until April 22nd 2018 

January was an exciting month for the Hayward Gallery, which reopened its doors on January 25th after being closed for essential maintenance for almost a year and a half. This Brutalist gallery boasts 66 pyramid rooflights that flood the space with light – and what better to shed light on than the impressive large-scale photographs of German Photographer Andreas Gursky. Lose yourself in the large, complex prints that depict a variety of moments in time. Gursky prompts the viewer to contemplate ‘​the way that the world is constituted’ whilst celebrating ‘the pure joy of seeing’. ​Remember: Chaos can be cathartic

https://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/hayward-gallery-art/andreas-gursky

 

 

#3: Art and Space at The Guggenheim, Bilbao ~ until April 15th 2018

Frank Gehry’s masterstroke of architecture is worth the trip to Spain alone – but coincide it with this exhibition and you will not be disappointed. Over 100 works of art have been carefully curated to create a dialogue between Gehry’s building and the exhibits. This show will prompt you to contemplate the important forces at play such as light, space, gravity and time, whilst offering a reinterpretation of the history of abstraction. ​Remember: Concepts should not be constrained.

https://arteyespacio.guggenheim-bilbao.eus/en/exhibition

 

 

#4: Louise Bourgeois at SFMOMA, San Francisco ~ until September 4th 2018

At a time where women’s issues are once again firmly in the spotlight it is perhaps timely to include Louise Bourgeois’s exhibition on our list. Occupying the entire sculpture gallery on floor 5 of SFMOMA this exhibition focuses entirely on her spider sculptures. Bourgeois was a pivotal figure in early feminist art and her work often references themes such as sexuality, gender and stereotypes. Through her exploration of all things arachnid, she draws insightful and playful parallels between our eight-legged friends and women: elegant, fearsome, industrious, protective and clever. Remember: ​Consternation can be good for one’s constitution. 

https://www.sfmoma.org/exhibition/louise-bourgeois-spiders/

 

 

#5: Takashi Murakami at VAG, Vancouver ~ until May 6th 2018 

Ok, so this exhibition might be a little closer to home than the rest of the exhibitions on this list, but it is just as important in significance because this will be Murakami’s first full retrospective on Canadian soil. This exhibition may not embody what you might traditionally associate with contemplation, but here is where this Japanese artist might surprise you. Alongside Murakami’s vibrant and playful take on popular culture lies some insightful and emotive works referencing Buddhist iconography, consolation and enlightenment. ​Remember: Crazy is the new calm

https://www.vanartgallery.bc.ca/the_exhibitions/exhibit_murakami.html

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